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Grump

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Platinum    0
Very nice Grump. I really want to know how you get the texture on your case color.

Hi ^^ :: I will answer what I think Grump did for the Textures you see.

The Textures in all are from the base Powder Coating. From that Point all Textures will carry thru the paintjob's

Hi,

Thanks alot for the reply....

So does this mean :

Brushed Alu = Anodized Alu ?

I'm a newbie here

Thanx

No Brushed alluminum = Brushed alliminum it is done thru a Sanding and Chemical Proccess -- Anodized Alluminum = Colored and ClearCoated if you wish for the Protection and Shine. If you would just like a Dull Colored Finish you dont need the Teflon Coating that they usually use after the Anodizing Proccess.

Grump:

Great Run thru on how to Highlight and Paint Perimiter's with a Fade Effect. Yes, the Switches do look very good. Go for it :lol: Keep up the Fun.

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Very nice Grump. I really want to know how you get the texture on your case color.

Hi ^^ :: I will answer what I think Grump did for the Textures you see.

The Textures in all are from the base Powder Coating. From that Point all Textures will carry thru the paintjob's

Hi,

Thanks alot for the reply....

So does this mean :

Brushed Alu = Anodized Alu ?

I'm a newbie here

Thanx

No Brushed alluminum = Brushed alliminum it is done thru a Sanding and Chemical Proccess -- Anodized Alluminum = Colored and ClearCoated if you wish for the Protection and Shine. If you would just like a Dull Colored Finish you dont need the Teflon Coating that they usually use after the Anodizing Proccess.

Grump:

Great Run thru on how to Highlight and Paint Perimiter's with a Fade Effect. Yes, the Switches do look very good. Go for it :lol: Keep up the Fun.

Ok....so brushed alu has lines on it and anodized alu has sort of an automotive paintjob finish...

Is that correct?

Thanx :D

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Platinum    0

Ok....so brushed alu has lines on it and anodized alu has sort of an automotive paintjob finish...

Is that correct?

Thanx :D

Well - Anodizing Will give you Color Yes.. But Anodizing will Retain the Brushed look.

Powdercoating and Paint give you a Car Paintjob look.

Hope that help's ya out.

Grump : need my morning Fix were ya at?? (Take your time) :o

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Ok....so brushed alu has lines on it and anodized alu has sort of an automotive paintjob finish...

Is that correct?

Thanx :D

Well - Anodizing Will give you Color Yes.. But Anodizing will Retain the Brushed look.

Powdercoating and Paint give you a Car Paintjob look.

Hope that help's ya out.

Grump : need my morning Fix were ya at?? (Take your time) :o

Ok,thanx alot Platinum you cleared me doubts !

So there are shops out there that will do his job for me eh... :D

Thanx. :P

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Grump    0
Very nice Grump. I really want to know how you get the texture on your case color.

That is just one of the options I had to choose from when I had the case powder coated. There are a huge number of solid colors, just like paint colors, and quite a few special effects, like metal flake and the texture I chose. I wanted something that would not show finger prints every time I touched it, something extremely durable and difficult to chip or scratch, but I also wanted a really sexy color.

Ok....so brushed alu has lines on it and anodized alu has sort of an automotive paintjob finish...

Is that correct?

Brushed aluminuminuminum is a texture effect. It can be done with plain vanilla finish or with anodized finishes. Anodizing is kinda like a dye -- it colors the metal without really coating it. It has a translucent quality. It's not like an automotive paint, which is part of what I have on my case (the yellow). You should be able to find an anodizer in a metropolitan area near you.

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One of my prime concerns with this new computer is noise. I am so tired of that vacuum cleaner sound emanating from the box on my desk. One of the components that can transmit a lot of noise is the hard drive -- usually 2 in my case. This time around, I am using RAID 0 -- striping my drives for performance. I did some checking, read some reviews and selected the drives that provide the highest quality and least noise.

Seagate Barracuda 160 GB -- times 2. At 7200 RPM and 8MB of cache, these drives are speedy. They are also rated near the top in quiet. Of course, there's always more that can be done to reduce the noise even further.

gc186.jpg

Those are hard drive coolers that use copper tubing to wick the heat away and cool the drives. The rubber pegs on each side help to isolate the vibration in the drive. This does present another problem though. They are now too wide to fit the standard location for HDDs.

gc190.jpg

No way can I even shoehorn them in there. The cooler with the rubber isolators make this setup 5.25" wide -- wide enough for the top drive bays.

gc202.jpg

But wait. There's two of them. This doesn't leave much room for optical drives or anything else. Not only that, it's hotter up there at the top of the case. One of the reasons I chose this system is so that I could eliminate the 2 fans at the front of the case -- the HDD cooling fans. My dog, Lulu isn't too excited about that position.

There is another solution. It's simple really. There's no reason the drives have to sit horizontally.

gc204.jpg

Now, there's not a lot of air circulation going on there, especially if I don't use the 2 fans that normally reside in those front brackets. But, I can arrange for a bit more air getting to those cooling tubes.

gc208.jpg

gc209.jpg

gc215.jpg

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gc224.jpg

gc228.jpg

Using a drill with a holesaw, a jigsaw, Dremel, files and sandpaper, I opened up the sides of the drive cage for a great deal more ventilation.

gc236.jpg

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gc246.jpg

It took about an hour and a half for this part. It's a little more difficult than cutting a window of the same shape in a side panel because of the protrusions and obstacles in the metal work. The metal structure of the drive cages is much thicker than a case door, but, as you can see, the Dremel can cut through it when it's necessary. In the other areas, the jigsaw made quick work of it.

Even though this part of the interior will not be on display -- the panel design does not reveal this area -- it still needs to be a clean and professional looking installation. At some point, the side panel will be off and someone will be looking in and going, "gee, that looks pretty cool." And it will be, as long as I pay attention to these kinds of details.

gc247.jpg

So, I will have 2 cool hard drives, 2 quiet ones to boot, and 2 fewer fans to listen to.

Grump

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Platinum    0

Very Nice Grump... "Cheer's"

Who make's the HD Cooler's if I can ask? send a PM Since I know they are not CM and would like to keep it CM related :)

The Look you created is really Sweet looking better and Better everytime you post. Keep it comming.

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Grump    0

Hi all,

Sorry for the long delay. I've been busy art work. And when you got a computer like this in progress, you HATE to go to work. But, I got a habit to support. ;)

It's time to put some of these pieces together.

gc301.jpg

I did a bit more painting on the framework after cutting that ventilation window for the hard drives.

gc337.jpg

I have a few modifications I need to make before any assembly. Unfortunately, I didn't follow my own rule about planning properly, so I will do some drilling and cutting after the powder coating is already done. But I think it's warranted and it prob'ly won't show.

First the mounting holes to secure the HDDs to the bottom of the case:

gc347.jpg

Then more ventilation holes -- for the hard drives, I want air to be able to come right up from under them; and for the system, I want to draw air from the side of the motherboard. The exhaust fans in the case should draw the air up nicely. Of course, I will cover these with filter material to keep dust and dirt out, to help deaden the sound and to make it look nice.

gc362.jpg

Now I can rivet the drive cages and PSU mount back on the top and bottom case panels.

gc370.jpg

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gc382.jpg

I sure like how that yellow fogging around the top exhaust fan turned out.

Anyway, the hard drives must also be mounted firmly in the upper part of the drive cage. To do that, I had to fabricate a shelf -- I made it out of black acrylic. The picture below shows the protective paper still on.

gc384.jpg

Nice fit.

gc392.jpg

You can barely see, at the rear right corner (that's not the only corner, but it's the only one you can see in the pic), some extra precaution I took to prevent vibration noise. This is what it is:

gc349.jpg

I had some rubber disks laying around, so I sliced them in two and slipped them between the acrylic shelf and the drive cage. Then I screwed the HDDs to the bottom of the case.

gc398.jpg

It's almost a shame that this modification won't even show unless I take the side panel completely off. But it will pay dividends in noise reduction, as well as space saving. Now I have room for the voltage meter for my new PSU, a spiffy new Aerogate I (sorry, but I think this is much prettier than the II model - even though I'm gonna mod it too) and some nice Cooler Master CCFLs.

gc390.jpg

I may decide later to do something about those ugly HDD labels, but until I find out if the drives actually work, I can't afford to void the warranty.

That's all for tonight. Happy modding.

Grump

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