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madFive

Real-Power Pro 1000 with 690?

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RaptorFury    0

well that idea is one of the best ideas yet . i bilt a case that did exactly that draw air from bottom of the case and even tho i couldnt monitor its temps i can say it did however ran better and my rails stayed more consisitant then having it vent case air ..

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VALKYRIE    11

The life of an electronic device is directly related to its operating temperature. Each 10°C (18°F) temperature rise reduces component life by 50%*. Conversely, each 10°C (18°F) temperature reduction increases component life by 100%. Therefore, it is recommended that computer components be kept as cool as possible (within an acceptable noise level) for maximum reliability, longevity, and return on investment.

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EsaT    0
The life of an electronic device is directly related to its operating temperature. Each 10°C (18°F) temperature rise reduces component life by 50%*. Conversely, each 10°C (18°F) temperature reduction increases component life by 100%. Therefore, it is recommended that computer components be kept as cool as possible...
Care to provide links to scientific studies proving that instead of WAGs?

Because that would already mean all electronic devices would be breaking up much more often in countries with warm climate! And that would surely have been widely studied and publicized.

It's much more complicated than that. While temperature surely has always effect to reliability as long as temperature stays inside designed operating temperature, especially inside reasonable range, effect is small compared to normal in-service life before device is obsolete or replaced. Reliability starts dropping rapidly when temperature goes over designed operating temperature and nears limits of components.

Also lowering temperature doesn't guarantee endless reliability increase of electronics.

For example hard disks might not like at all from too cold, study done by Google using data collected from their database servers showed that high failure rates where associated both with high and low temperatures, which is entirely logical when question is about component containing mechanical parts. Especially aerospace uses often demand wider operating temperature ranges even from purely electric components without any moving parts... also aerogel insulated electronics of MERs have to be heated during nights to prevent other kind freezing than just BSOD.

So there's clearly certain desired temperature range where reliability is generally highest and the farther you go from that to either direction the lower the reliability.

is better a PSU suking fresh air direct from outside of the case , because the hot air inside the PSU decrease the production of WATTS and also decrease its lifetime
That's again question of bad design and overal quality. (besides PSU isn't over-unity device and doesn't produce any energy, neither is watt measure of energy)

Quality PSUs provide full output at least up to 40C ambient temperature, mostly up to 50C. And probably those 40C rated PSUs could be easily made to withstand 50C simply by changing fan to one which moves more air preventing additional temperature rise of components. If you read real PSU reviews instead of lousy half-previews you might notice that quality PSUs can easily provide full output power in hot box tests which expose PSU to upper end of specified operating temperature range. (or even more in some cases)

Again if PSU is made to break up, like old CWT made Antec SmartPowers which used junk Fuhjjyu capacitors and gravely undersized cooling for them, hardly anything you can do matters because those "break up with high reliability" in low temperatures and with very light loads.

Now I'm not saying that running PSU constantly under full load with high intake temperature doesn't affect to reliability. But in case of high quality PSUs effect is probably quite small if either ambient temperature is near room temperature or load is light (=PSU itself doesn't produce much heat) unless you intended to use same PSU through half of your lifetime instead of typical replacement interval.

And as long as chassis has adequate exhausts on/near top and intakes on bottom/lower front aren't too solid there isn't way for air on bottom of the chassis to heat much higher than room temperature. Or if that possible few degree difference affects so much to PSU that PSU is junk in any case and should be used only as paper weight. (I think they don't yet have "hammer throwing" contests with those)

Also there's one thing which might turn end result to other way, with fan side up heat can easily rise away from PSU after PC is shut down and PSU's fan stops providing cooling while with fan downwards that heat trapped inside PSU has much more restricted escape way. (remember how data/video projectors behave if they're constantly shut down by cutting power)

But like I said if producing more than necessary amount of noise isn't concern you might as well get one of these, install it to window and pipe airflow to PC chassis.

I myself prefer adequate cooling with least amount of noise.

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VALKYRIE    11

Esat wrote:........"(Care to provide links to scientific studies proving that instead of WAGs )".........

*Based on the Arrhenius equation, which says that time to failure is a function of e-Ea/kT where Ea = activation energy of the failure mechanism being accelerated, k = Boltzmann's constant, and T = absolute temperature.

You can check the website here http://www.pcpower.com/technology/optemps/

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EsaT    0

Don't trust everything what advertising departments say. Especially those which are known to be unreliable, like this one.

PSU has moving parts, fan. So it definitely has certain lower temperature limit before reliability starts to drop. Too cold would increase wear of bearings, depending on bearing might even prevent fan from starting and that would be definitely extremely bad thing for reliability.

Asus A8N's chipset fans have actually demonstrated this temperature related behavior, those chipset fans are absolutely crappy and after some use they start keeping resonating shrieking sound when you start PC which continues from few seconds to as long as I had patience to listen it. I noticed that when fans had just started producing these boot up sound effects there was clear temperature dependancy on it, if room was warmer when I started PC shrieking generally didn't occur or it was short but when room was colder noise was guaranteed and it continued for longer time before fan started running normally.

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madFive    0

Well – I got the psu and uber-fans installed (using 5x Sunon 120mm 3100rpm 90cfm) – still no computing components in the case, but I have it set up to install once I know what I’m putting in it.

The fans on the top and back of the case are acceptably quiet even at 100% capacity – just the windy roar I was expecting – I’m guessing this is because of the solid frame they are attached to. I can stand behind the case and feel a very refreshing breeze blowing in my face – fun stuff.

Oddly, however, the two I mounted on the side panel produced a loud high-pitched humming/whining sound that was pretty intolerable – maybe because of vibrations thru the thin side-panel, or maybe because they were scraping on the side-panel somehow. I used my fan-controller to throttle those two down to around 25% and now the noise overall is generally acceptable.

Does anyone know where to get some good rubber washers or padding that will lower the noise on these further? Probably just need to take a trip to the local hardware store…

I am continuing to be shocked at the sheer volume of the cords coming out of the RP-Pro1000 – they don’t fit behind the mb tray – right now I have most of them bundled together and stuck in the bottom of the hd bay area. You were definitely right about there not being enough space in this case for enough devices to use all these plugs. Still it’s nice to know I’ve got plenty of headroom for expansion if I ever decided to go overboard on raid/sli/etc…

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EsaT    0

Add some heavy (I mean heavy, not foamy light) sound absorbtion mat to side panel.

Also some fans just vibrate much more than others (and produce bearing noise until zero rpm) so might be also because of those fans.

Well – I got the psu and uber-fans installed (using 5x Sunon 120mm 3100rpm 90cfm)
Arghhh... that's at least half too much for my taste... and ears.

You better start "Dremeling" and replace back fan's honeycomb with standard wire grill.

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madFive    0
Add some heavy (I mean heavy, not foamy light) sound absorbtion mat to side panel.

Any idea where to get this stuff (link)? I was thinking i should just need enough to line the edges of the two side fans, but if it comes in large sheets, i might as well line the whole side pannel.

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