Sign in to follow this  
sorjorla

Survey: Your next power supply purchase (Blue Ice Giveaway!)

What is the most important criteria when you decide to buy the next power supply?  

23 members have voted

  1. 1. What is the most important criteria when you decide to buy the next power supply?

    • Wattage
      10
    • MTBF (Mean Time Before Failure)
      1
    • Price
      2
    • Appearance
      2
    • Efficiency
      9


Recommended Posts

Infinity    0
I think I have upset you, and now you don't want to talk. Sorry, that wasn't my intention.

Not at all, Just that this thread was started as an aid for sorjorla to get her work done, rather than as a general discussion :)

Coolermaster don't include their top quality psu's with their chassis (since that would increase the price too much), however, the ones they do provide are a lot better than most.

What I'm saying regarding the "bigger is better and means less heat" is that if for example (figures plucked at random):

All coolermaster brand psu's produced 1watt of heat for every 2watts of power drawn from the supply, therefore if you had a 400 watt CM psu and pulled 300 watts from it, it would produce 150 watts of heat, if you had a 600 watt CM psu and drew the same 300 watts from it, it would still only produce 150 watts of heat, technically.

Obviously, this isn't taking into consideration that the 600 watt version in this example would contain bigger heatsinks and faster fans because it's capable of producing more heat than the 400 watt version (300 watts of heat v's 200 watts of heat) so it may (however, not usually) physically be cooler because of this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Infinity    0
But if I am wrong and good technology is out there (utilizing heat pipes or some more recently implemented cooling techs) perhaps a passive power supply is not out of the question... :shock:

If the powersupply was built into the chassis, then the technology is there to provide high wattage power with no active cooling due to the huge surface area the chassis would provide (especially so if the rear of the chassis was a similar finned design to a heatsink), however, as an after-market self contained product, it's still a bit 'touchy' because there simply isn't the space within an atx psu enclosure to provide passive cooling. I do however recently remember seeing a moderate wattage passive psu which had a huge heatsink sticking out of the back (roughly 1.5x the size of the psu body) connected via heat pipes (the idea is that natural convection should be enough to draw the heat from the heatsink), good idea, but very bulky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RaptorFury    0

that is a ___ psu . lets not forget the psu is the most abused item in the computer . as far as goin completly passive , the only way i can think of goin to a passive cooling solution is what they do on car amps the casing itself is the heat sink .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wacft    0
i don't see why users should pay more for a psu that can be SILENTLY cooled down with 2 fans.

because they want to. :roll:

its not like anyone is forcing them to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wacft    0

you are throwing around what you think. there are people that want no noise psu's. people who want that should get a no fan psu. im not sure why you are saying they shouldnt make them. its not like theyll make them and never make a fan cooled psu again. its just another area to make money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ninuhadida    0

no noise doesn't mean no fans. i have 9 fans in my system and you won't notice it's on apart from leds and stuff. if thee is ppl who want to get a noiseless psu they wouldn't pay more $$$ just for a fanless psu which of course doesn't have any fans, but they'll pay less for a noiseless psu which has a fan or more. and yeah it's another area to make money but i dont really think that fanless psus attracts much ppl since it usually costs more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Karma Ghost    0
If the powersupply was built into the chassis, then the technology is there to provide high wattage power with no active cooling due to the huge surface area the chassis would provide (especially so if the rear of the chassis was a similar finned design to a heatsink), however, as an after-market self contained product, it's still a bit 'touchy' because there simply isn't the space within an atx psu enclosure to provide passive cooling. I do however recently remember seeing a moderate wattage passive psu which had a huge heatsink sticking out of the back (roughly 1.5x the size of the psu body) connected via heat pipes (the idea is that natural convection should be enough to draw the heat from the heatsink), good idea, but very bulky.

I would say that without fans there could be more room inside a PSU for the act of convection. If the entire PSU was able to receive the ambient air from inside and outside of the case, I would say that it is possible using heatpipes to cool it in a self contained way.

But then again, I don't think any of us are power supply engineers. It's all just speculation.

And perhaps it is not altogether impossible for a company to implement a power supply into a chassis. If it were a good stable 600/700W power supply it could be future proof for a while I'd say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_ferry_    0

My perfect power supply:

- No more AT cable's (those flat 5 pin ones) i'will cut them off anyway.

- enough real power, >500watt

- good stability features, every brand can say there powersupply rules, no one can see it. Wanna see big elko's inside hehe.

- SLI power

- 2 12volt rails, 1 for sli/mainboard, 1 for the rest

- 12cm fan when led fan used: various colors so no need to void warranty

- some way of creating a modulair PSU would be great in the way of connecting a small power supply for your HDD's for example witch will be switched on when powering the system. Like the dual power system of a stacker.

- USB connection with software to read and adjust your voltages

/end of dream

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ID    0
if thee is ppl who want to get a noiseless psu they wouldn't pay more $$$ just for a fanless psu which of course doesn't have any fans, but they'll pay less for a noiseless psu which has a fan or more. and yeah it's another area to make money but i dont really think that fanless psus attracts much ppl since it usually costs more.

That's the reason why CM should find a cost-effective way of implementing passive-cooling. There's a huge trend moving towards silent, stealth PCs and I'm more than sure that there are plenty of people who would be interested in this kind of product. Passive cooling has been used on pretty much every other piece of heat-generating hardware. I see the PSU as the natural, next step.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this