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stylish83

Cooler Master Aquagate overheating

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Dark-Rain    0

I just read a post above me and had an idea... where exactly is your temp sensor placed? If it is between the heat-sink and cpu then take it out and put it on the side of the heat-sink. The temp sensor will be creating a gap which is not good for your cpu... just a theory...

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zerospace    0
I just read a post above me and had an idea... where exactly is your temp sensor placed? If it is between the heat-sink and cpu then take it out and put it on the side of the heat-sink. The temp sensor will be creating a gap which is not good for your cpu... just a theory...

I think this is basically what he's already done. :wink:

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stylish83    0

well i took out the temp sensor from previous position and place it need the side latch and this time it is locked into place. It is not loose anymore than before but im taking a risk because were it is placed, it could get slightly damaged, but it has doen the job for now.

the temp is not on the actual CPU chip but on the edge of the shell of the chip (if you get my point)

the temp readings look fine but i dont know, i do not know anyone else how has got a aquagate on the 775. everyone else in other forums uses it on AMD or lower than 775...

the actual waterblock is completely locked to the point were the MB could start to bend (in which is dont want it to do). there is no air on the CPU and the waterblock...

but yet i dont know about the BIOS temp and aquagate temp, now there is a big difference between both...

thank you for your time people...

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merovingian    0

I got bad news. First, if your tank temps are high then you must have the aquagate installed correctly or it wouldn't be dissipating the heat to the waterblock causing the temps in the tank to get so hot. Makes sense right? So, I'm currently experimenting with an aquagate setup and it just gets worse. These temps only get with in reasonable ranges under heavy load on an AMD 64 3000+ IF the fan settings are on high. The high fan setting sounds like a small vaccume cleaner, the whole point of WCing for me was to keep the noise level down, no such luck. All in all the aquagate looks great and has a nice build (some aspects are of poor design) but isn't very practical in real world use as it doesn't cool very well or it isn't quiet. :evil:

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stylish83    0

if this is the case what should i do? would it be best to replace the water block or something???

the whole point of me of getting the aquagate was to have less noise, cool the system and the main thing is that i dont like extreme heat. My radiator for my room is which off and the computer now and then can produce enough heat when running for a long peroid, to heat up room same box room....

they say puttin the computer next to a brick wall will help but its not helping that much....

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merovingian    0

You and I are in the same boat, wanted watercooling cause we want some case quiet. Aquagate looks great with a sweet CM build feel but the performance just isn't want we are looking for. I'm looking at other options at the moment one of which is building my own system. I'm in a little worse off position as I have cut the power switch cord and spliced in more wire so it could reach the upper dummy slot on the msi board. Anyway, I would certainly return the product as a new waterblock will only increase your tank temps which already look too high. Unless...thinking...I don't know how powerful the pump is but a radiator might do the trick but I don't think that the pump can handle a radiator big enough. All this is why I just want to build my own system as this process has just been a pain in the arse. Hah, english slang works on the boards, right on. Anyway, you look around and I'll look around and well see if we can't come up with a solution. :)

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Dark-Rain    0

I run the CM:A on an AMD64 3200+, i switched the fans from standard to a 25d.b. blue led fan which actually runs at slower speeds than the inbuilt fan. On speed setting 2 i get average temperatures of 32 degrees centigrade (deg c) on the cpu and 29 deg c in the tank. When i am gaming the temps go up to about 40 and 39 respectively...

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merovingian    0
I run the CM:A on an AMD64 3200+, i switched the fans from standard to a 25d.b. blue led fan which actually runs at slower speeds than the inbuilt fan. On speed setting 2 i get average temperatures of 32 degrees centigrade (deg c) on the cpu and 29 deg c in the tank. When i am gaming the temps go up to about 40 and 39 respectively...

That's a winchester core, right? Is it overclocked? Cause I'm trying to clock to around 2.7Ghz @ 1.5375V and I need to run burn in tests and test with programs like prime95 for stability. Not to mention that I would also want to cool down the GPU as well, no way that is going to happen.

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Dark-Rain    0

I havn't attempted any overclocking on my system and i believe it is the Winchester i have. This could be why you are running a little hotter and i use the inbuilt gpu cooler (mainly due to the fact that the gpu block for the aquagate isn't available in the uk)

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merovingian    0

Yeah, I think these venice chips run a little hotter than the winnies and I am putting up the voltages. I still think I want to go water but I'm going to have to build my own. What if you mounted the pump and radiator outside and out of direct sunlight. No noise? Hmm...

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