Recommended Posts

Addison is inspired by a Canadian radio design from the 1940s. It has a water-cooled Intel Core i7-4770K CPU running at 4.6GHz and an overclocked Nvidia GTX 970 video card.

The enclosure is crotch mahogany with aluminum trim and has a capacity of 10.6 liters.

354.jpg

360.jpg

362.jpg

363.jpg

Left and right vent holes to service the power supply and graphics card.

366.jpg

367.jpg

368.jpg

Coca-cola can size comparison technology is flawed because of the trademark display. An alternative is the common DVD or CD.

377.jpg

Or for the more traditional.

378.jpg

The raw wood edges mate with similar raw wood surfaces in the decorative cover. Any kind of paint or finish on physical contact surfaces tends to not work as smoothly as these waxed raw wood surfaces.

379.jpg

284.jpg

An original 1940 Addison Model 2 Radio

370.jpg

373.jpg

374.jpg

354.jpg

372.jpg

359.jpg

Specs:

Intel Core i7-4770K CPU

Gigabyte Z97N-WiFi Mini-ITX Motherboard

Gigabyte GTX970 Video Card

HyperX Fury 8GB System Memory

HyperX 480GB SSD

Silverstone 450W Modular SFX Power Supply

All-In-One Generic 120mm water cooling

Thanks for looking!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Project goal is to design and build a powerful as possible gaming rig into a small as possible enclosure. 

 

Note: I place captions below photos.

 


 

013.jpg

Start by building a temporary structure to help mock up equipment locations. 

 

 

014.jpg

 

015.jpg

 

016.jpg

This will be my first use of water cooling even though it is just an AIO unit.

 

 

 

356.jpg

The key to this build is this Mini-ITX sized GTX 970 from Gigabyte.

 

 

 

357.jpg

 

358.jpg

 

026.jpg

Gigabyte has been a sponsor of mine since 2006. This is the WiFi version of their Z97 Mini-ITX gaming board. I chose this over their GA-Z97N-Gaming 5 board because I didn't need the onboard Killer NIC and liked the idea of having dual HDMI instead of just one.

 

 

 

032.jpg

 

 

 

033.jpg

 

027.jpg

Silverstone has been a sponsor of mine for over ten years.  

 

 

 

028.jpg

For this project I'm using the modular cable version of their 450W SFX PSU.

 

 

 

029.jpg

Here it is sitting next to their hard wired version. Modular cables are awesome but for this design so are the fan and power cable connector locations.

 

 

 

030.jpg

Kingston HyperX is a new sponsor. They provided me with this 480GB SSD which will be the system's only drive.

 

 

 

031.jpg

 

034.jpg

They also sent me this 8GB Fury kit rated at 1866MHz.

 

 

 

037.jpg

 

 

 

Thanks for looking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
052.jpg

Chopped up a bunch of 1/2" thick basswood sticks and glued them up into the matrix. Backing board is 1/16" aircraft grade birch plywood.

 

 

 

 

 

053.jpg

 

054.jpg

Carved out the openings with a razer knife and sandpaper.

 

 

 

055.jpg

 

041.jpg

 

042.jpg

Glued up some offset spacers for the I/O plate mounting.

 

 

 

043.jpg

 

044.jpg

 

045.jpg

 

047.jpg

 

048.jpg

 

049.jpg

 

050.jpg

The thickness of the cases back plate is determined by the mounting tangs of the video card. I also need the thickness to provide extra support because this sucka is heavy.

 

 

 

051.jpg

The project height will be determined by the 8-pin PCIE power connector on the video card. I have a low-profile version in the works. Until then the height of the back plate will remain "crazy tall".

 

 

 

046.jpg

Assembled the components and tested by installing Windows 8.1. Microsoft has been a supporter of mine for the last four years by providing the OS for all projects. Photo can also be captioned "Ten pounds of sh*t to go into a five pound bag".

 

Thanks for looking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
056.jpg

Low-profile graphics card power connector will help keep down the overall height of the enclosure. I calculate about 10mm savings which translates to approximately .6 liters in my design.

 

 

 

057.jpg

This is the cleat that will eventually hold the radiator mounting plate to the case. It needs to be removable so I'm using threaded wood inserts. First drill out pilot holes.

 

 

 

058.jpg

An Allen wrench is used to set the insert into place.

 

059.jpg

 

060.jpg

 

061.jpg

This is the radiator mounting plate with holes located for the four radiator mounts and two slots cut for the hoses. Opening for air flow is on the to-do list. This is 6-ply 1/8 inch aircraft grade birch plywood.

 

 

 

062.jpg

Mounting the cleat using 8-32 screws.

 

063.jpg

 

064.jpg

There will be an identical cleat mounted to the other end of the radiator plate. The cleats will be attached to the interior of the case so as to span the distance front to back.

 

 

Thanks for looking.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
066.jpg

Cut out the radiator opening and trimmed the plate length to size.

 

 

 

067.jpg

I had to add some material for the video card mount in order to allow adequate depth for the wood insert. I also had to widen the face on one side in order to center the radiator fan (and opening). 

 

068.jpg

 

069.jpg

Wood insert and screw for the video card mount. I'll install another one next to it after adding more material to the area. I always use both screws in a two slot video card although some say that is overkill.

 

070.jpg

 

071.jpg

The front plate is identical to the back plate dimension-wise. Same 1/16" birch plywood with 1/2" reinforcements.

 

 

 

072.jpg

Here the two are back to back.

 

 

 

073.jpg

Here they are stacked. 

 

 

 

074.jpg

Both face plates have the same 1/8" ledge to help align and fit them to the bottom plate.

 

 

 

075.jpg

Something like this. The height will be trimmed down significantly as soon as I get comfortable with what it should be. Sits nicely until the wind blows.

 

 

 

076.jpg

The radiator plate tossed on top. It will bridge the front and back plates eventually. I'm experimenting with 15mm thick radiator fans instead of the stock 25mm fans and that could greatly alter the radiator plate position.

 

Important to note here that all of this is an internal structure that won't be seen when finished. There is a completely separate candy-coated outer shell that will slide down over the top of this inner structure.

 

Thanks for looking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
077.jpg

Attached the cleat to the front panel.

 

 

 

078.jpg

Showing the embedded screw inserts.

 

 

 

079.jpg

Attached the cleat to the back panel.

 

 

 

080.jpg

Radiator mounting panel with attachment hardware ready to go.

 

 

 

081.jpg

Most of the scribbling is just random thoughts from some previous project. I tend to write on wood instead of paper.

 

 

 

082.jpg

Front and back panels bridged by the radiator mount.

 

 

 

083.jpg

 

084.jpg

 

085.jpg

Added in the bottom panel. This will be glued together eventually but I still have significant work to do on the individual panels so this is just a photo op.

 

 

 

 

086.jpg

 

087.jpg

 

088.jpg

Framed in the PSU so it can only move one way...upward. 

 

 

 

089.jpg

Bought this mesh desk set at OfficeMax for cheap.

 

 

 

090.jpg

Loads of high quality mesh that will take me years to use. Some brands are better than others. I like this variety because it is a tighter mesh.

 

 

 

091.jpg

Finally after all these years I sprung for a crimper. This project hinges on reducing the mass of cables.

 

 

 

092.jpg

Over the years I have amassed a virtual mountain of spare modular cables of all varieties. I feel comfortable that I can experiment and screw up on a grand scale without too much consequence.

 

 

 

093.jpg

First up is the 12V EPS 4+4 cable. My board doesn't need the +4 so half of the cables disappear before it gets shortened. Before and after photo.

 

 

 

094.jpg

Next up is the PCIE cable. Instead of the 6+2 connector nonsense I'm going with exactly what I need...8-pin. Before and after. Note: I'm not concerned with fancy sleeving or anything right now. I'm only concerned with proper length and whether it actually works or not. I assumed up front that I'll be making each cable twice before all the dust clears.

 

 

 

095.jpg

SATA cable was a piece of cake because I have done them before. Before and after photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for looking. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
100.jpg

Mocked up with the help of some heavy-duty rubber bands. The upper corner pieces are temporary to keep the box square. They will be fitted permanently later.

 

101.jpg

 

 

102.jpg

A Delta AFB-series fan...for when you get tired of playing with toy fans.

 

 

 

 

103.jpg

Coke can in classic reclining pose.

 

 

 

104.jpg

Circle drawn on the front will be the location of a 120mm exhaust fan.

 

 

Note again: This is all internal structure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
105.jpg

For cutting a large 135mm hole I mark it off with my precision optical measuring guide.

 

 

 

106.jpg

Next I mount the piece in the chuck on my floor mounted drill press and select my 135mm hole saw. 

 

 

 

107.jpg

Took a long time to drill the hole. Seemed like five hours. Must be a dull saw blade.

 

 

 

108.jpg

Not as clean a cut as my CNC router but it is currently down for calibration.

 

 

 

109.jpg

Cleaned up the edges with my oscillating spindle sander.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
110.jpg

Beginnings of the decorative cover. This is the start to the fascia. It's in the front and it's in your face. Fascia.

 

 

 

111.jpg

135mm hole.

 

 

 

112.jpg

Hand carved with a razer knife. About 13 hours.

 

 

 

113.jpg

SSD mount.

 

114.jpg

 

115.jpg

Carved out some indents to relieve some interference with the PSU modular cable latches. Probably one of the most useless things in a computer. Whose modular cables have fallen out of the PSU because there wasn't a little piece of plastic locking them in? OK maybe Elon Musk has to worry about one surviving a space launch but...seriously?

 

 

 

116.jpg

 

117.jpg

 

118.jpg

Cut a 120mm fan hole in the center of the front interior panel. Glued up a fan support system.

 

 

119.jpg

Also cut out center section of radiator panel mounting cleat. I had left out the glue in this middle part when the cleat was originally attached.

 

 

120.jpg

Scythe SY1212SL12M (1600RPM) Slip Stream Slim 120x12mm Fan

 

 

121.jpg

Probably mounted backwards. I dunno. Don't care right now. This the better looking side. There are no flow markers so they are making me think.

 

 

122.jpg

Cut a fan clearance/support section out of the radiator plate.

 

 

123.jpg

Also cut out a small notch to allow the PCI-E cable to disappear down below the plate. 

 

 

 

124.jpg

 

125.jpg

Fan isn't mounted in the traditional manner. I would call it "restrained in place". I was concerned about stresses on the incredibly thin frame caused by mounting screws. I also don't want fasteners coming through the front panel because of the nature of the decorative cover mounting system.

 

 

 

126.jpg

 

127.jpg

 

128.jpg

Again. Facing the wrong way...I think.

 

Thanks for looking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
129.jpg

Been cutting up timber and punching out holes for my decorative cover.

 

 

 

130.jpg

This is wood angle. It is CNC cut from solid wood.

 

 

 

138.jpg

The angle is fit to each corner and acts as the foundation for the cover. All the exterior bits will be attached to these pieces. They are the only contact points with the interior box when the cover slides off and on.

 

 

 

131.jpg

The cover's front face includes an 135mm hole. This is the outlet for the 120mm Scythe fan.

 

 

 

132.jpg

This is the cover's back panel. It is cut to size but is being left blank for now because I haven't decided to do a full coverage panel or a cut-down "bikini" back panel. Either way, it starts with a full-sized wood panel.

 

 

 

133.jpg

The video card side panel with its 92mm vent hole

 

 

 

134.jpg

The PSU side panel also with a 92mm vent hole.

 

 

 

135.jpg

The top panel has an 135mm hole yet to be cut.

 

 

 

136.jpg

This is 11/16" quarter round made of pine. My design calls for rounded shoulders on the left and right edges. I'm going to incorporate these two pieces into the cover construction to get those curves.

 

 

 

139.jpg

Probably the most complex part of this project will be integrating this quarter round into the edge. Here it is placed nearby its future home. This means I'll be veneering on a curve later in the project. Always fun!

 

 

 

137.jpg

Progress so far all tossed together for a photo op.

 

Thanks for looking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.