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      AM4 Socket Support   04/24/2017

      Due to technical issues, the topic on "AM4 Socket Support" has disappeared. We apologize for any inconvenience this has caused and we are trying our best to have this topic back up as soon as possible.   As we read in the topic, there is a lot of discussion going on when the new brackets will be arriving. We can tell you now that the brackets will be ready for pre-order on our CM Store EU tomorrow and will be ready for shipment around the 16th of May.   You can continue the discussion in this newly created topic:     

OGS

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Everything posted by OGS

  1. Oy! This mod is something that I've been wanting to build for some time. It is a tribute to the cooler master ammo 533 case. The project is going to be an evolution from the Ammo series, both from an engineering and design standpoint. Personally I have been part of the Mekatronix Works (mktrx) case-mod team. We've previously participated in a number of regional events, in the last couple of years. Before that it was mostly custom watercooling and jerry-rigging our cases to fit the components. I am going to be using a similar HW monitor display system, in-build into the case as one of our previous projects "Tek'tonic III" (link below) The previous builds I have worked at were more of an abstract design and served no purpose in utility. With this competition I have the chance to build my system into something that will feed the nostalgia of my lanparty days. The materials I will be using: Aluminium, Plexi, Dibond and Carbon fiber reinforced ABS. previous builds: Tek'tonic Tek'tonic III Rog COOPER
  2. Thanks!
  3. Thanks for that! I've got yet one more post. The motherboard got it's glamour treatment: the heatsinks have been painted to match the mod's color scheme. RGB lighting installed and blinkiinging away nicely. The power and reset switches were a real pain to get working in the middle of the night, they require 6v input and all I had was a 12v power rail. Please check the second post on the first page for all the glory shots.
  4. Loads to say about the work in this post: The exterior walls are constructed from plexiglass. I sanded down both sides and applied a coat of white paint to the side facing in and two layers of white and black of vinyl to the outside. The top-most, black layer, of vinyl was laser-cut at low power thus producing the design you see. The sanding and layers of paint and vinyl allow light injected through the sides to bounce around inside the sheet of plexi and seep out uniformly where the black vinyl layer was cut away. The graphics card got its own special treatment. I removed card's plastic shroud to allow the fans to sit flush against the side-panel bringing in plenty of fresh cool air. Since the card is mounted at the center of the panel, two output ports: hdmi and displayport were brought to the exterior with extension cables.
  5. Finished up the 3d printed corner bumpers. As these are rather complex shapes with a bit of over-hang, there was a lot of excess material to sand down and polish, almost ran out of elbow-grease!I applied the usual post-sanding treatment: filling primer and paint, as well as small detail work on the screw holes.
  6. The controller will be a Raspberry Pi.
  7. As promised, this mod features an LCD display on one of the side-panels. This is a throwback to a previous mod, Tek'tonic III, but unlike it, this side-panel display is not transparent. The screen is driven by a raspberry pi single board computer, allowing hardware status information and animations to be displayed with no performance penalty to the main gaming rig. Status information is fed to the raspberry pi over an internal network from an open source hardware monitor package. This setup also allows me to remotely boot up the system or display news and notifications while the main system is turned off. I started with a compact flurecent backlit monitor and gutted everything except the screen film and driver board. A light diffuser was laser-cut from plexiglass with a saw-tooth pattern on all edges. This is to fit the RGB LED strips, turning this into a thin edge-lit display panel. The LED strips are neatly covered with aluminium tape to prevent light from bleeding out. I used RGB LEDs as this will allow monochrome screen animations to be color-synced with the rest of the system's RGB lighting.
  8. Well, most of the case is made out of composite materials, so i shaved some weight off that way. I also did a few resistance tests, and It's solid as a tank!
  9. Figured it was about time i got a handle on things. I started off by designing the part with a look reminiscent of a peli case. I then proceeded to 3d print the components from carbon fiber reinforced filament for added strength and support. The outer shell is assembled around an aluminium pipe core to give it a solid foundation before being primed with filler, sanded down and painted over.
  10. Thanks man! Glad to hear that you like it!
  11. Today's adventure brings in a pcie riser cover. While 3d printers are pure awesome when it comes to prototyping, getting a quality part requires some elbow grease. The rough part was first cleaned and trimmed before applying a generous coating of filling primer. After a short break hanging out on the drying rack, the part was sanded down to a smooth finish. A laser-cut vinyl stencil was then applied, followed by a few coats of white paint. Peel an onion, you get a smaller onion. Peel the vinyl and you get ...a PCI-e riser cover!
  12. Today I got to finish painting the composite panel parts. Used a self etching filling primer, sanded it down and then painted it neatly.
  13. Needed a distribution board for the RGB LED strips. Started off with a bare copper clad board and applied a layer of paint as masking. The PCB was then laser and chemically etched before applying a final acetone treatment to remove the paint masking. All that remains is to drill the holes and solder on the pin headers. Since this is a single layer PCB the headers will have to go on the reverse side.
  14. Main body of work on the pulley system got finished today. I started off by 3d printing, separating, and hand finishing a few sets of timing pulleys. Some metal work followed. I cut up some aluminium pipe and steel threaded rod. Assembled the pulley system using a bucket load of nuts and screws.
  15. Preparing outer surface for painting, since the composite panel comes coated with some sort of enamel. Had to deepen the bending grooves to release some tension before bending. Made a bending contraption with the laser cuter. Used some cyanoacrylate to maintain the 45° angle of the bend.
  16. Parts are here! CPU: Intel® Core™ i7-5930K MOTHERBOARD: ROG Strix X99 Gaming MEMORY: Kingston HyperX Fury DDR4-2666 32GB Quad-Channel (8 DIMM) STORAGE: 2 x 240GB Kingston HyperX 3K SSD (RAID 0) VIDEO CARD: ROG Strix GeForce® GTX 1080 OC edition POWER SUPPLY: Cooler Master V650 COOLER: custom water block with Alphacool NexXxoS ST30 Full Copper 240mm radiator and Monsoon water loop CASE FANS: Cooler Master: MasterFan Pro 120 Air Pressure
  17. Thanks! Most of all, this mod is meant to be a tribute to the Cooler Master Ammo 533, a few snaps of which you'll find in the first post in this thread, nested amongst the sketches. There's a few nods to classic titles such as portal and rocket league. The central pillar of the design is sticking to non-colors: black, white and a few shades of grey. There's a few reasons for this: - I get easily bored with a fixed color scheme, a monochrome design, side panel LCD display and the wonders of RGB lighting solve this issue. - It makes tweaking the design much easier as the mod progresses. - It eludes versatility: few things are as versatile as an ammo box! Dropping this case on your desk at any lan-party should immediately convey that.
  18. They say nothing beats using the right tool for the job. In this case, that would be a CNC router. The next best thing is to improvise a router table and use it with stencils as my laser cutter can’t handle metal work. Load up a 45 degree drill bit and execute precision grooves to bend the flat composite into load-bearing edges and pillars. Laser cut a set of acrylic stencils. Double-sided sticky tape holds everything together. Use stencils with the router to shape the composite and pilot screw holes. Count remaining fingers on each hand. The slides cover the parts highlighted in red (top right corner).
  19. Quick update with some sketches that I've been working on for the past few days. I've eyeballed most of the measurements, some adjustments may be necessary. The first attachment shows the external, left-hand side of the build. I'll be fabricating this from aluminium composite materials (3rd pic) tomorrow. It's usually a bad ideea to build this from the outside in, but hey that's what sketches are for. Queue some hardcore dremel action. Second attachment is a rockin' pulley transmission system. Bit of a headache to design, but just wait and see it in action! None of the components, that I ordered, have made it through shipping yet, so it's all fabricobbling until the easter bunny hops around.
  20. This post was initially reserved for the final submission shots, that time has now come. I give you MKTRX Ammo 315, the ultimate lan-party rig:
  21. Hi fellow modders!